IBS and It’s Connections To Adenomyosis & Endometriosis

Hey everyone, welcome back, and today we will talk about IBS and its connection to adenomyosis and endometriosis. I will tell you below for those who don’t know what IBS is or what the other two are.

IBS stands for Irritable bowel syndrome, which is a common disorder that affects the large intestine. Signs and symptoms include cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, gas, and diarrhea or constipation, or both. IBS is a chronic condition that you’ll need to manage long term.

Adenomyosis is a condition in which the uterus’s inner lining (the endometrium) breaks through the uterus’s muscle wall (the myometrium). Adenomyosis can cause menstrual cramps, lower abdominal pressure, and bloating before menstrual periods, resulting in heavy periods.

Treatments: Hysterectomy, Pain Medicine, Birth Control, and Hormone therapy

Endometriosis (en-doe-me-tree-O-sis) is an often painful disorder in which tissue similar to the tissue that usually lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus. Endometriosis most commonly involves your ovaries, fallopian tubes, and the tissue lining your pelvis.

Treatments:  Hysterectomy, Pain Medicine, Birth Control, Hormone therapy, Conservative surgery, and Aromatase inhibitors 

If you are new to my blog, you should know that I am on the verge of having stage 2 adenomyosis and have IBS. In the medical world, ando ( for short) is known to get progressively worse over time without treatment. Not much research has been done, and I plan to change that now back to business. 

A common symptom of all three conditions are visceral sensitivity. This means someone with either condition has a lower pain tolerance for abdominal or pelvic pain. Their nerve endings may be especially sensitive. This can lead to a heightened response to pain. Some of the additional shared symptoms between all three and IBS include: 

  • abdominal cramping 
  • bloating 
  • diarrhea 
  • nausea 
  • pain with bowel movements
  • painful periods

Because of the shared symptoms, women tend to be misdiagnosed. 

How are they diagnosed? 

Honestly, they wing it. Doctors don’t have just one test that diagnoses either condition. When diagnosing IBS, doctors often try to rule out other medical conditions that cause similar symptoms. For example, lactose tolerance or Crohns disease. They may also order a colonoscopy or endoscopy. For ando & endo, there are a few different ways to be diagnosed, such as:

  • Pelvic Exam
  • Ultrasound ( Vaginal)
  • Surgical laparoscopy 
  • Medications 

What is it caused by?

Ando: 

There is currently no definitive cause; however, some research has suggested that hormones may play a role. Specific hormones thought to play a role include estrogen, prolactin, progesterone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. It seems to be a condition to occur later in life, in women who have had children already. Having had a C-section at some point appears to be a risk factor, as the procedure itself breaks through the uterine wall. Also I have seen cases of young women around 9 or 10. 

Endo:

No one knows for sure what causes this disease. Researchers are studying possible causes such as genetics or hormones. Endometriosis occurs more often in women who have short menstrual cycles or a longer-than-normal flow: Women who have fewer than 25 days between periods or who menstruate for more than seven days are twice as likely to develop endometriosis. And dioxin, an industrial chemical, may be a cause.

IBS: 

The third’s time a charm, right? Sadly there is no cause for IBS. There are possible factors like genetics and prior adverse life experiences (e.g., infection, trauma) that predispose someone to get IBS. You may feel muscle contractions, increased sensitivity to food, gas, or stool in the bowel. Other causes are brain-gut interactions. 

How are they tied together?

I know most of you probably scrolled down to figure out what the significant connection is?

With endometriosis, the tissue growths from endometriosis can develop next to the large intestine. Excess tissue can lead to inflammation and contribute to problems with bowel movements. 

With adenomyosis, sometimes the uterus is so enlarged that a lump can be felt in the lower abdomen and can also cause pressure on the bladder and bowel, causing urinary frequency and constipation. It’s typically the same with endo but a little different. 

I know that was a lot of information, so if you have any questions, please send them here.

(https://www.humblesoullifeofajuicer.com/question-me.php)

Check back in a few days for a new post. Stay bright.

Refrences: 

https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/endometriosis
https://www.webmd.com/women/endometriosis/understanding-endometriosis-basics
https://medlineplus.gov/endometriosis.html
http://endopaedia.info/subtype17.html
https://www.moms.com/adenomyosis-explained/
https://www.healthline.com/health/womens-health/endometriosis-and-ibs

http://sifaka.cs.uiuc.edu/~yuelu2/opinionintegration/health/Adenomyosis.htm

lhttps://patient.info/news-and-features/is-adenomyosis-the-cause-of-your-heavy-painful-periods

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